Tuesday, January 25, 2011

Hawk moth



I found this moth one evening on a chair. The dictionary definition of a hawk moth is any of a family (Spinghidae) of moths with a thick, tapering body, slender wings, and a long feeding tube to suck the nectar of flowers.

Although I didn't follow the progress of these caterpillars around my plants, I'm sure they turned into beautiful moths later. I have to say that the most beautiful hawk moth i have photographed is the Hummingbird Moth. Sadly, not a single one of them has visited my garden this year!
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13 comments:

Sylvia K said...

Lovely moths and great captures as always! And as always, I learn something on your blog that I didn't know before!! Hope your week is going well!

Sylvia

Mildred said...

I love your photos today. Out my window today is drab and grey. I will look forward to spring time and lots of green! Enjoy your day.

Ginny said...

Well, I enlarged it to get a better look, because I have been wanting to see a hawk moth. I must say he is pretty ugly! I would be scared if one flew near me, thinking it to be a bat!!! Very interesting!!!

lotusleaf said...

Great captures as always, Kanak. How does one tell the catterpillar of a moth from that of a butterfly?

Nature Rambles said...

Sylvia...thanks! Hope your week is good too!

Mildred, the creek, the trees of Nalley Valley come to mind. Looking forward to your Springtime photos!

Ginny...I know. Rather sinister, especially in the dark!!

Lotusleaf...I guessed...and then I looked up a whole lot of H.M. caterpillars on Google images. Found a great deal of matching ones!:-))

Boonie S said...

Lovely moths. We get a lot of mothquitoes over here.

All the best, Boonie

Stephanie said...

I am sure they will come back for you one day. Be patient ;-) Btw, good shots!

SandyCarlson said...

They are amazing. So are you.

Cyren said...

You know how much I love your garden Kanak, it puts everyone to envy!!! The moths were simply beautiful and are those the larvae of the same moths? They tend to burrow underground to form their pupae so its quite hard to document unless you dig out the chrysalis and photograph them as they emerge in a bell jar (which is what I do) On the other hand, cheer up, the year's just started so I'm sure the hummingbird hawkmoths will be back anytime soon. Incidentally, has any hummingbirds ever visited your garden?

By the way, in response to a post you got above, its often rather difficult to tell which caterpillars are from butterflies or moths but the hawkmoth caterpillars always have a "tail" protruding from their rear end :)

Nature Rambles said...

Hi Boonie...so glad you stopped by!

Steph...thank you so much!

Sandy...so happy to read your words...thanks to all the bugs who visit me and making it possible for me to get their photos taken!:)

Cyren...looking at the pictures of the images that I post anyone might assume that I have enough space. But no, it's just that my area happens to be teeming with wildlife and I'm lucky to be able to photograph them within the four walls of our compound. And I also make it a point to check out the butterflies, lizards, and dragons at least once a day. No, we don't have hummingbirds here but we have the sunbirds. Only two kinds have visited my plants so far.

Thanks for telling me about the hawkmoth caterpillars...about the tail from the rear end. It'll be easier for me to ID them from now on.:)

indicaspecies said...

I love your nature posts.

fialka012 said...

Krásné...

Johnny Nutcase said...

neat little friends, great shots of these guys!